Meeting Recap

meeting recapThe regular writing craft meeting took place Tuesday January 21st at 6:00 pm. Three members were in attendance: Barb M., John and Diane.

The discussions included the quality of printing done by Lulu, the writing of a Mary-Sue character, the wins and losses in a character’s arc and the current day-formula for writing books, making movies and writing songs.

The lesson on self-editing covered identifying hidden verbs in sentences. Hidden verbs is the process of turning a verb into a noun and adding another verb to the sentence for it to make sense. Hidden verbs do three things:

  1. It makes the writing sound pompous, boring and flat.
  2. It tells instead of shows, and in some cases suggests nothing really happened.
  3. It makes sentences unnecessarily longer.

EXAMPLES

  • Hidden: We will make a decision on Tuesday.
  • Uncovered: We will decide on Tuesday.
  • Hidden: She gave him a hug.
  • Uncovered: She hugged him.
  • Hidden: He’d make a more thorough assessment when he paid for the goods.
  • Covered: He’d assess him thoroughly when he paid for the goods.

The endings -ment, -tion, -sion and -ance can, but not always, indicate a verb transformed into a noun and hidden within a sentence.

EXAMPLE

  • Hidden: They made the decision to fight their way out of the castle.
  • Uncovered: They decided to fight their way out of the castle.

Homework

We read our homework assignment, which was to take the following sentence and write a story.

It was a wrong number that started it, the telephone ringing in the dead of night, and the voice on the other end asking for someone he/she was not.

NOTE: The character can be either male or female. You choose.

This is the first line in the novel City of Glass by Paul Auster (1985)

Word Count Goal: 433 words.

HOMEWORK for February

Take a character from a story you’re working on right now and write a 350-word backstory for them.

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